Archive for the ‘Football’ Category

I can’t tell if the flag has “codes” or not.

We appear to have them, but then I’ve also read where the Supreme Court overturned Flag Codes as unconstitutional a few years after the Pledge of Allegiance was deemed a violation of religious freedom, at least for non-military personnel.

Regardless, there are some things that I do know:

*  Kneeling is considered to be one of the most respectful acts in the world.

*  Colin Kaepernick’s protest was passive and peaceful, exactly what we all want to see in a protest.  He didn’t overturn any cars.  He didn’t bash the front windows of shop keepers.  He didn’t use hateful language.  He was just one guy in a sea of guys and all he did was kneel instead of stand.

*  There are lots of violations of Flag Codes that seem to go unmentioned, including the flag used in advertising (Section 8.i… there goes all the 4th of July marketing!) and the most ironic:  “The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.”  (Section 8.c)  So everyone in a football stadium standing to respect the giant, HORIZONTAL flag covering the field is, in fact, disrespecting the flag.  The Kaep anger, in context, seems a bit hypocritical, no?

*  The NFL didn’t even require players to come out for the National Anthem until 2009, so it’s not like it was a long-standing traditional (pun intended!).

…AND…

I also know — as an employer — employees shouldn’t be doing personal things on company time.

So, ultimately, I don’t know why there’s a controversy.

If Colin Kaepernick — or any other American — wants to protest something… a freedom that we’ve fought wars over to protect… they should be allowed to do it peacefully… on their own time.

If they want to do it on company time, though, and what they’re protesting is not part of the job description, then they have the freedom to not do that job.

The NFL should have outlawed political expression after Week 3 of Kaepernick’s protest a few years back… in the same way they outlawed commercial expression in the 80’s… and it was a good thing they did, else every NFL player would look like a walking advertising billboard by now.

So maybe what everyone should really be upset about is why Roger Goodell, commissioner of the NFL, makes $40 million a year and can’t even put out a simple camp fire in his own backyard.

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I’m a big Jimmy G. fan… as is everyone in the Bay Area.

However, I can remember being a big Colin Kaepernick fan as well… as it seemed everyone was in the Bay Area, too.

And why not?  Kaep ran wild against the mighty Packers in a playoff game.  He — single-handedly — was reinventing the quarterback position.  He brought us to Conference Championships and even the first Super Bowl in many years… came within a whisper of winning it, too.

I even remember a friend posing the ultimate question:  “Would you rather have an aging Aaron Rodgers leading your team into the future… or a fresh disruptor like Kaep?”  I remember at the time it feeling very much like a toss up.  Rodgers already had one MVP under his belt, but it is impossibly to deny that we were all still punch-drunk with Kaep’s u-n-l-i-m-i-t-e-d  p-o-t-e-n-t-i-a-l.

So, when everyone asks, “what could possibly go wrong with making Jimmy G. the highest-paid football player in the league after only starting seven games?!” it’s hard not to think we were all feeling just as giddy about Kaep at one point…

… a feeling that seemed to go away as fast as it came.

P.S.  With that said, I want to say for the record that I was one of the fans at this year’s incredible Niners-Titans game screaming, “Let Jimmy kick!  Let Jimmy play D!  Let Jimmy coach!”  Certainly seems like he can do anything he puts his mind to on a football field.  :)

Long-time marketing/sales/tech guy Bill Campbell passed yesterday.

Not a lot of people outside Silicon Valley knew him… but everyone inside did.  Among his many business feats, he somehow managed to play significant roles at arguably the two most important — and competitive — technology companies in the world, Apple and Google… at the same time!  If ever there was a testament to how good Bill was — or how much influence he had in Silicon Valley — that’s it.

As significant, Bill was very active in the Sacred Heart community (where my daughter goes to school)… not just donating (which he did a LOT of), but participating, too… indeed, he coached a generation of “powder puff” girl football players.  Sadly my daughter will have missed the coaching-experience-of-a-lifetime by just a year.

I always chuckle when I think how I met Bill.  It was at a big Macworld party.  At the urinal.  Just two guys having a simple chat.  No stranger to a locker room, Bill was absolutely a guy’s guy.

I met with Bill in (ahem) a more professional environment when he took over the Claris division of Apple.  My T/Maker business partner Heidi Roizen and I pitched Bill on making our award-winning word processor, WriteNow For Macintosh, the upgrade to MacWrite.  At one point during the conversation Bill took us on a tour of Claris’ new headquarters… mostly empty because the spin-out was brand new… and mostly there were just IT and facilities folks walking around.  What impressed me about Bill was he knew everyone by name… essentially the “little” people… and true to his coaching reputation, high-fived several of them as we walked by.

He just seemed like someone you wanted to play for… err, I mean, work for.

Nothing came of the conversations, but we stayed in touch.  Bill asked me to serve on the board of Great Plains Software (eventually acquired by Microsoft) and, unfortunately, I was in the process of taking a company public and felt I couldn’t short-change my shareholders, things were so incredibly, incredibly hectic.  On top of that Laurie’s dad was in the process of passing away.  Reluctantly, and hesitantly, I explained all of this to him… and to my great relief he couldn’t have been more gracious — and supportive — in his understanding… it was easy to see why he was a true elder statesman.

Our paths would cross from time to time.  Ironically, about 25 years after my Claris meeting, I was cleaning out my basement and found an old WriteNow t-shirt… to which I proudly wore to the next sporting event at Sacred Heart.  As luck would have it, I ran into Bill… and without skipping a beat, he pointed at my t-shirt and laughed, saying something like, “it’s still going strong after all these years!”  Goodness knows he’s had a lot more important things on his mind between then and now… but it brought such a smile to my face that he remembered.

Here’s to someone who went strong for 75 years.  Rest in peace, Coach.

This will change at some point — and when it does, there will be a big pop — but right now YHOO can’t win a free kitten.

With a completely inferior position, Yahoo absolutely smashed the competition.

That is, they streamed the first live, free NFL game on Sunday.

It was between two small market teams.

It was also between two inferior teams… the Jacksonville Jaguars (1-5) and the Buffalo Bills (3-3).

It was also at 6:30am on the west coast, hardly what you would call “prime time.”

And it was also in London, England… where travel time and sparse crowds have translated into lethargic play in the past.

In other words, this game had all the exciting build up of a wet rag.

And yet, YHOO SMASHED results… 15 million unique viewers… vs. the 1 million viewers a region game like this normally gets on TV (source: Julia Boorstin, CNBC).

And yet — unbelievably — most of the press this morning had a negative bend.

Maybe Marissa Mayer needs to take a tip from Elon Musk:  If you can’t trust the press to get your story straight… TWEET!