Archive for the ‘Shanghai’ Category

Another oblivion morning… first five minutes were hell… I think the largest interday drop for the Dow ever.

To the point I was making in my, “Investing Is Easy, eh?” post this weekend… about it not being as bad for Chinese consumers as the headlines say… which means it’s not as bad for AAPL as the headlines infer:

Tim Cook made a rare statement about his business in China this morning.

“As you know, we don’t give mid-quarter updates and we rarely comment on moves in Apple stock,” Cook wrote. “But I know your question is on the minds of many investors.”

“I get updates on our performance in China every day, including this morning, and I can tell you that we have continued to experience strong growth for our business in China through July and August. Growth in iPhone activations has actually accelerated over the past few weeks, and we have had the best performance of the year for the App Store in China during the last 2 weeks.”

“Obviously I can’t predict the future, but our performance so far this quarter is reassuring. Additionally, I continue to believe that China represents an unprecedented opportunity over the long term as LTE penetration is very low and most importantly the growth of the middle class over the next several years will be huge,” Cook added.

However, I think Tim Cook did more than put the China situation into perspective for AAPL investors…

… I believe he may have single-handedly stabilized a global meltdown.

Wow.

I can’t understand why AAPL recently touched $110 and isn’t instead cruisin’ up to the $140’s by now.

I mean, I intellectually understand why people might be worried about China…

…. but not really…

… the China stock market “crash” happened so fast I can’t believe anyone actually noticed.  Even with the crash, the market is still up about a third year-over-year, so most investors (as opposed to traders) are still holding on to nice gains.  But to further minimize any effect on the Chinese consumer, 90% of Chinese households don’t even own stock.

On the other hand, there are some pretty irresistible AAPL drivers right now, including:

  •  AAPL has a consensus P/E of 12.7 vs. 17.7 for the S&P… however, Apple is increasing EPS a whopping 45% vs. a paltry 7.9% for the S&P… hardly seems fair, eh?
  • AAPL has upgraded only 27% of their existing iPhone installed base… which gives them a lot of room for continued organic growth
  • AAPL still has very large external targets, though… for example, India… and a bunch of unhappy Android users
  • Oh, yeah, AAPL has other billion dollar products, too
  • AAPL may be set to release iOS TV… which could do to the TV biz what the iPhone did to the cell biz… which is, of course, completely turn a huge, massive industry on its ear
  • AAPL has more money in the bank than, well, everyone

.

All of which is why — with full disclosure! — I’m back on the AAPL bandwagon.  <smile>

I get there is a lot screwed up about the Chinese stock market… top of which is government intervention.

However, there’s just something extra weird about the Chinese stock market “bust.”

As in, it happened so fast, I wonder how people even noticed?

Most bubbles take years to inflate.  That is significant because the longer something is inflating, the more people get sucked into the action that eventually get hurt.

But the bubble portion of the Chinese Shanghai market rose & fell within a few months… that’s like the blink of an eye.

Sure, over the last year the Shanghai has about doubled… and it’s reasonably to call that frothy.  But how about over the last five years?  It’s only up about 30% — TOTAL — for an economy that has been growing in double digits.

In contrast, most of the U.S. indices have about doubled during that same five years… for an economy that has only had low single-digit growth.

With a longer-term perspective, can we really say China’s stock market didn’t deserve at least some kind of fractional growth?  

But what is the effect on Chinese consumers?

Even with the recent fall, the Shanghai is still up over about a third year-to-date… which should make a lot of investors (not traders) still feel pretty good.

And to further minimize damage to the investing public, apparently 90% of Chinese families do not even own stocks.

So you wonder how a spike & “crash” that happened that quickly… that affects only a minority of buyers… and for the most part probably affects them in a positive way… could really wreck that much consumer buying havoc?

Of course, the reason I bring this up is because of AAPL… analysts are worried that Apple’s big Chinese growth engine is going to come to a screeching halt.

I just don’t see it.

Note that after our last two stock market crashes in the U.S. — and despite unemployment — spending actually went up.  Cheap energy was the reason… which we have now again.

So while I don’t disagree that the Chinese stock market — and the Chinese economy for that matter — may be really screwed up, I wonder if those people bailing on AAPL aren’t looking at this all wrong?